The BIM to Field Alliance was founded in order to provide architects, engineers, contractors, sub-contractors, and building owners a comprehensive, trustworthy, and collaborative single-source for information regarding the notion of extending BIM data to the field.

BIM: A Look Ahead To The Future

Posted by BIMtoField in Misc    07/21/2010

I’ve spent $50,000 on a BIM model for design and preconstruction—now what?

It’s a question that comes up with increasing frequency as progressive contractors invest in modeling projects of all sizes and scope to support design discussions (such as clash detection). While 3D modeling and BIM is coming of age in the design and preconstruction aspects of construction, there remains a critical gap in the application of this data to and from the field.

In most cases, construction field crews still print out construction documents much like they’ve done for the last 50 years.  When this happens, contractors lose the accuracy, speed and quality advantage gained in the BIM design effort.
 
This must change if we are to gain lifecycle benefits of BIM. We must facilitate a seamless interface to the field that makes use of parametrically correct data. The idea is to capture data out of the models, use it in the field and then bring the data back to the model to create a digital file that lives through the facility’s life.

Much of the technology to facilitate this data sharing bridge exists today. There are BIM tools that allow users to grab accurate digital data – 2D or 3D – from virtually any source (Solibri, Revit, Tekla, etc.) and move it to the field.  Developers are also working on a connection that will take cloud data from a laser scanner directly into a BIM model – a connection that will significantly improve the creation of as-built models on rehabilitation and renovation projects. The first version of a laser scanning to BIM connection will likely appear by the end of this year.

This is just the beginning. It’s imperative that we as an industry address the BIM-to-field connection sooner rather than later. The economics of the industry for the next few years will be challenging. It’s well documented that we are at 2006 levels for construction spend, and nobody expects significant change moving forward.  Most industry watchers expect to see 2008 levels in 2013.
 
That said I’m bullish on contractors’ opportunities to grow and be profitable given the dynamics that are changing this industry. It will be an uneven next five years that will be dictated by how contractors adopt change. The construction community must overcome the fear of new technology adoption. We must build smart connections between people, processes and technology if we are to deliver projects with greater efficiency, accuracy and quality.

Pat Bohle, General Manager, Trimble Building Construction Division


Post a Comment
Share

More BIMtoField Posts   View All

  •  Denver’s Innovative Asian Tropics Exhibit

    Denver’s Innovative Asian Tropics Exhibit

    The $50 million 10-acre Asian Tropics conservation center exhibit at the Denver Zoo in Denver, CO, will be one of the most advanced, sustainable zoo habitats in the world, featuring...

    02/15/2011

  • BIM for the Construction Business Owner

    BIM for the Construction Business Owner

    Funny thing about some words… An article about BIM… Written for the Construction Business Owners By Marc Goldman The word “building” is...

    03/10/2011

  • Resources for the BIM World

    Resources for the BIM World

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) has become a very hot topic in the construction industry over the last five years. It would appear that the flames became exponentially hotter year after...

    03/12/2011

  • BIM : “FUTURE OF PROJECT INFORMATION!!”

    BIM : “FUTURE OF PROJECT INFORMATION!!”

      After many years of development, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is starting to achieve significant penetration into the building sector of the construction industry.Laing O’Rourke’s engineering team have around 40...

    05/31/2011

  • 3D Modeling: What it really means

    3D Modeling: What it really means

      Managing risk has now become easierMost people have heard of 3D Modelling and Building Information Modelling (BIM) but far fewer understand that these tools transform the development process and...

    07/13/2011

  • BIM:  A Look Ahead To

    BIM: A Look Ahead To

    I’ve spent $50,000 on a BIM model for design and preconstruction—now what?It’s a question that comes up with increasing frequency as progressive contractors invest in modeling projects of all sizes...

    07/21/2010